Posts

Molly


Super happy, joyful and content – Molly’s calm and welcoming presence soothes us all as she keeps a watchful eye on well, everything.


Kassandra (Cassie)


Cassie is named after Kassandra in Homer’s Odyssey, the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy who was cursed to utter prophecies which were true but which no one believed. Kassie is our faithful protectress and keeps the clan safe from coyotes, bears and mountain lions. She is a Jeruselem donkey, named because of the cross on her back, which is thought to be because of how the donkey carried the Holy Mother.


Francisco


Cisco (Francisco) is an appendix quarter horse. This means that he is thoroughbred and quarter-horse – bred for competition in the hunter-jumper shows. He is named after St. Francis of Assisi for which Santa Fe is also named.


Cimarron


Cimarron means ‘the untamed one.’ He was a leopard appaloosa, and his lineage followed back all the way to Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce peoples who bred these horses to be outstanding war horses.

Cimarron’s spirit and impact resonates with everyone who’s spent time with him. His special vibration is still present here at Thunderbird Ridge. Missed in his body, his strong horse medicine connects with us and teaches us.

An EQUUS Wisdom Circle, named in his honor, took a moment to honor him and to invite his spirit in with as we carry the work of the Circle forward.



I have been repeating ‘Cimarron’ to myself often, appreciating his majesty and feeling super lucky to have his name carry us. – Meighan Leibert



In joyful memory of my mentor & friend Cimarron and his playful strength and presence, I commit to honoring his vitality through my full participation in our journey. – Tom Isaacson



There’s a calm moment, up close or even when viewed from a distance, when the invitation to simply connect and “be” happens. When accepted, it’s a shared moment. It’s an exchange of deep connection and true presence. There’s acknowledgement in this connection, and thrill, and joy, and peace, and everything that is. It is a silent invisible energized thread. It is felt where your soul lives. It’s that connection between spirits that once felt, is always available to you. This is my experience of the EQUUS herd and of Cimarron. – Dan Weil, CPCC


Dante


Dante (named after epic divine comedy Dante’s Inferno – an allegory representing the journey of the soul toward God). He is a an imported lusitano – a Brazillian bull fighting horse. He came to us from the equestrian world-wide show Cavalia and is credited for showing EQUUS the true way of liberty work.


Brio


Brio is a an imported lusitano – a Brazillian bull fighting horse. His name, when applied in Brazil to horse breeding, implies a particular quality of heart, fire, spirit and virtue.


Blue


Blue is a percheron-quarter-horse mix. The percheron’s were French battle horses who carried soldiers and pulled artillery and cannons during World War I. Blue is our miracle horse because after suddenly and inexplicably going blind, she regained nearly all of her sight through the intuitive guidance of working with alternative healing practitioners.


Artemis


Artemis is what is known as a ‘ghost paint’ or ‘phantom paint’. This means she is a registered paint horse, but lost her spots to turn all white when she was three. She is the matriarch of the clan. Artemis is a Greek goddess, known as the goddess of the hunt and is one of the most respected of all the ancient Greek deities.


Aedín


Meet Aedín, a little black mare who came to us in January of 2020. We renamed her Aedín after she lived with us for a while because of her amazing spirit. Aedín is Gaelic for ‘little fire’ and the name is associated with a mythical figure – a heroine who rides on a horse of fire from heaven to change the world. Aedín is indeed a little fire. At only 6 years old, she had never been trained, ‘broken’ or ridden. Though a very high pedigree horse and elite athlete — she ‘slipped through the cracks’ somehow and ultimately ended up at the “kill pens.” We suspect it was because she is not the kind of horse that is easily tamed, manipulated, intimated or forced. She didn’t play by the rules.

She was saved from the kill pens in 2019 by a benefactor who went to South Dakota to find her, claim her, and who brought her back to health. Ultimately, Aedín was brought to us. Even with the story of her past, her strong spirit is intact. She is not traumatized, bitter, mistrusting, shut down or numbed out. She has joined our herd of six equines with ease. Everyone loves her and respects her — it’s not always that easy to introduce a new herd member — the herd sees her as she is. We are not all what we appear to be. Aedín is small in stature and she is an absolute force. Aedín is kind, confident, brave, respectful of others, very fair, yet demands respect. It is heart filling to see her spirit blossom. She is not easily intimidated, becoming extremely fiery when she feels something is unjust.


“People talk about getting back to normal,” said a colleague the other day, a senior executive who has been working from home for a large health care organization since the lockdown. “Well, I don’t want to go back to normal! Normal was insane!”

She’s right. Normal American life was insane.

Pages

Molly


Super happy, joyful and content – Molly’s calm and welcoming presence soothes us all as she keeps a watchful eye on well, everything.


Kassandra (Cassie)


Cassie is named after Kassandra in Homer’s Odyssey, the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy who was cursed to utter prophecies which were true but which no one believed. Kassie is our faithful protectress and keeps the clan safe from coyotes, bears and mountain lions. She is a Jeruselem donkey, named because of the cross on her back, which is thought to be because of how the donkey carried the Holy Mother.


Francisco


Cisco (Francisco) is an appendix quarter horse. This means that he is thoroughbred and quarter-horse – bred for competition in the hunter-jumper shows. He is named after St. Francis of Assisi for which Santa Fe is also named.


Cimarron


Cimarron means ‘the untamed one.’ He was a leopard appaloosa, and his lineage followed back all the way to Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce peoples who bred these horses to be outstanding war horses.

Cimarron’s spirit and impact resonates with everyone who’s spent time with him. His special vibration is still present here at Thunderbird Ridge. Missed in his body, his strong horse medicine connects with us and teaches us.

An EQUUS Wisdom Circle, named in his honor, took a moment to honor him and to invite his spirit in with as we carry the work of the Circle forward.



I have been repeating ‘Cimarron’ to myself often, appreciating his majesty and feeling super lucky to have his name carry us. – Meighan Leibert



In joyful memory of my mentor & friend Cimarron and his playful strength and presence, I commit to honoring his vitality through my full participation in our journey. – Tom Isaacson



There’s a calm moment, up close or even when viewed from a distance, when the invitation to simply connect and “be” happens. When accepted, it’s a shared moment. It’s an exchange of deep connection and true presence. There’s acknowledgement in this connection, and thrill, and joy, and peace, and everything that is. It is a silent invisible energized thread. It is felt where your soul lives. It’s that connection between spirits that once felt, is always available to you. This is my experience of the EQUUS herd and of Cimarron. – Dan Weil, CPCC


Dante


Dante (named after epic divine comedy Dante’s Inferno – an allegory representing the journey of the soul toward God). He is a an imported lusitano – a Brazillian bull fighting horse. He came to us from the equestrian world-wide show Cavalia and is credited for showing EQUUS the true way of liberty work.


Brio


Brio is a an imported lusitano – a Brazillian bull fighting horse. His name, when applied in Brazil to horse breeding, implies a particular quality of heart, fire, spirit and virtue.


Blue


Blue is a percheron-quarter-horse mix. The percheron’s were French battle horses who carried soldiers and pulled artillery and cannons during World War I. Blue is our miracle horse because after suddenly and inexplicably going blind, she regained nearly all of her sight through the intuitive guidance of working with alternative healing practitioners.


Artemis


Artemis is what is known as a ‘ghost paint’ or ‘phantom paint’. This means she is a registered paint horse, but lost her spots to turn all white when she was three. She is the matriarch of the clan. Artemis is a Greek goddess, known as the goddess of the hunt and is one of the most respected of all the ancient Greek deities.


Aedín


Meet Aedín, a little black mare who came to us in January of 2020. We renamed her Aedín after she lived with us for a while because of her amazing spirit. Aedín is Gaelic for ‘little fire’ and the name is associated with a mythical figure – a heroine who rides on a horse of fire from heaven to change the world. Aedín is indeed a little fire. At only 6 years old, she had never been trained, ‘broken’ or ridden. Though a very high pedigree horse and elite athlete — she ‘slipped through the cracks’ somehow and ultimately ended up at the “kill pens.” We suspect it was because she is not the kind of horse that is easily tamed, manipulated, intimated or forced. She didn’t play by the rules.

She was saved from the kill pens in 2019 by a benefactor who went to South Dakota to find her, claim her, and who brought her back to health. Ultimately, Aedín was brought to us. Even with the story of her past, her strong spirit is intact. She is not traumatized, bitter, mistrusting, shut down or numbed out. She has joined our herd of six equines with ease. Everyone loves her and respects her — it’s not always that easy to introduce a new herd member — the herd sees her as she is. We are not all what we appear to be. Aedín is small in stature and she is an absolute force. Aedín is kind, confident, brave, respectful of others, very fair, yet demands respect. It is heart filling to see her spirit blossom. She is not easily intimidated, becoming extremely fiery when she feels something is unjust.


“People talk about getting back to normal,” said a colleague the other day, a senior executive who has been working from home for a large health care organization since the lockdown. “Well, I don’t want to go back to normal! Normal was insane!”

She’s right. Normal American life was insane.